April 19, 2014

How Explosive is the Denver Broncos Offense?

Just how explosive is the Denver Broncos offense? Does their offense remind you of the days when you played Madden on Xbox as a kid?

After eight games, Denver is 7-1 and scored at least 33 points in each of their games. Last year Denver never eclipsed the 40-point mark during their 13-3 regular season. This year Denver averages 42.8 points per game. The fewest points Denver scored this season is 33 which came against the Indianapolis Colts on October 20, their only loss of the season.

Denver demolished the Washington Redskins 45-21, including a franchise-record 31 points in the fourth quarter after trailing 21-7 halfway through the 3rd quarter.

They became just the fourth NFL team to score at least 50 points in consecutive games. Denver scored 51 points against the Dallas Cowboys on October 6. The week before Denver racked up 52 points against the Philadelphia Eagles.

Prior to this season, Denver scored 50 points just once in franchise history. Denver has scored at least 40 points in five out of their eight games played.

Denver has scored 343 points, most ever by any team eight games into a season. If Denver continues their pace, they will score nearly 700 points this season. No NFL team has scored 600 points in a season.

QB Peyton Manning has thrown 29 touchdowns to 6 interceptions with 2,919 yards passing. Could we possible witness 60 touchdown passes with 6,000 yards passing? After eight games Manning averages nearly 365 yards passing per game. Three players have contributed with at least 45 receptions and are on pace for over 90 receptions.

In Week 1 against the defending Super Bowl Champion Baltimore Ravens, Manning threw 7 touchdown passes, tying an NFL record. The Broncos become the first team in NFL history with three players catching at least two touchdown passes from the same quarterback. Manning becomes the first quarterback ever with three career games of six touchdown passes.

In Week 2, Peyton played his younger brother Eli and the New York Giants. Manning became the third quarterback ever to achieve 60,000 passing yards while doing it in the fewest games played. Dan Marino and Brett Favre are the others to throw for over 60,000 yards.

Two weeks later, Denver demolished the Philadelphia Eagles 52-20. It was the most points scored in a game by the Broncos in their 54-year history. After four games in September, Manning had thrown 16 touchdown passes to zero interceptions, an NFL record to start the season for most touchdown passes thrown without an interception.

Then in Week 5, Denver Broncos stay undefeated when Matt Prater kicked the game winning 28-yard field goal as time expired in Denver’s 51-48 victory over the Dallas Cowboys. Both teams combined to score 99 points, tied for the 4th most combined points scored in an NFL game.

In that game, Peyton Manning completed 33 out of 42 passes for 414 yards with four touchdowns and one interception. It was Manning’s first interception compared to 20 touchdown passes this season. Manning’s 20 touchdown passes are the most ever through five games to start a season.

With Manning’s 414 passing yards, it is his 10th career game with at least 400 yards passing, tying him for second with Drew Brees. Miami Dolphins quarterback Dan Marino holds the NFL record with 13 career 400-yard passing games. Also Manning moved into second place in career passing yards with 61,371, trailing Brett Favre’s 71,838 passing yards.

Overall Manning has thrown at least two touchdown passes in 10 straight games, including the final two regular season games of the 2012 season. The Broncos have scored 30+ points in 11 straight games. Denver is 18-1 in their last 19 regular season games.

The fun continues today when the Broncos play the San Diego Chargers.

 

Remember RG3…in the Valero Alamo Bowl!

Throughout its 143-year history, college football has showcased many outstanding players—long to be remembered for various accomplishments, including spectacular plays, leading a team to a national championship or for winning one of college football’s annual awards.

Of all the hardware that has been awarded, one brings back memories of the previous winners simply by mentioning its name.

This award is the Heisman Trophy, awarded since 1935.

Like with life itself, many surprises have been associated with this award.

It has been said that a player who wins the award often wins as a result of an outstanding season and from the backing of a poet (writer) in the press box.

Some schools present a full-blown ad campaign similar to a person running for political office while others let their players’ accomplishments speak for themselves.

The majority of the players winning this award came from winning teams. One player won from a school that finished the season with an equal amount of wins and losses (Jay Berwanger, the first recipient of the award). Another player won from a sub-.500 team: Notre Dame’s Paul Hornung in 1956. His team finished 2-8-0.

A complete breakdown of each season since 1935 shows that 25 winners never participated in the postseason—including 19 of the first 22 honorees.

Since 1970, Houston’s Andre Ware, the 1989 awardee, is the only Heisman winner not to play in a postseason game.

Of the remaining 52 former winners, 43 have gone on to play in a bowl game that would be considered—in today’s terms—a “BCS Bowl Game.”

 

"BCS Bowls"       Games      W-L
Orange              10       7-3
Rose                11       6-5
Cotton               7       4-3
Sugar                8       3-5
BCS Title Game       4       2-2
Fiesta               3       1-2

 

Baylor’s Robert Griffin III was selected as the 2011 Heisman Trophy Winner. Not only was he chosen to be the first winner from Baylor, but his selection also broke a string of two consecutive winners that would lead his team to the National Championship.

Davey O’Brien was the first Heisman Trophy winner to lead his team to the National Championship. There have been 15 in total.

 

Year     Winner              Team
1938     Davey O'Brien       Texas Christian
1941     Bruce Smith         Minnesota
1943     Angelo Bertelli     Notre Dame
1945     Doc Blanchard       Army
1947     Johnny Lujack       Notre Dame
1949     Leon Hart           Notre Dame
1976     Tony Dorsett        Pittsburgh
1986     Vinny Testaverde    Miami
1993     Charlie Ward        Florida State
1996     Danny Wuerffel      Florida
1997     Charles Woodson     Michigan
2004     Matt Leinart        USC
2005     Reggie Bush*        USC
2009     Mark Ingram         Alabama
2010     Cam Newton          Auburn
 
*Heisman Trophy later vacated

 

RG3 became the ninth winner of this prestigious award to play in what can be classified as “Non-BCS Bowl Game.” Griffin led the Bears to the Alamo Bowl; the first time a Heisman winner would play in this game.

 

"Non-BCS Bowls"   Games      W-L
Liberty              2       2-0
Alamo                1       1-0
Holiday              2       1-1
Capital One          1       0-1
Citrus               1       0-1
Gator                2       0-2

 

Let’s take a closer look at the nine players who won college football’s most prestigious award, but did not showcase their abilities on the stage of a “BCS Bowl Game.”

Interestingly, the first two Heisman Trophy winners to play in a “Non-BCS Bowl Game” came in back-to-back seasons (1961-62), but then not again until the 1988 season; a year when college football would see many of its records fall as Barry Sanders established many standards.

 

Heisman Trophy Winners that played in and won a “Non-BCS Bowl Game”:

  • 1961 Ernie Davis, Syracuse, Liberty (30-140/rushing)
  • 1962 Terry Baker, Oregon State, Liberty (9-21, 123/passing)
  • 1988 Barry Sanders, Oklahoma State, Holiday (29-222/rushing)
  • 2011 Robert Griffin III, Baylor, Alamo (24-33, 295/passing)

Heisman Trophy Winners that played in and lost a “Non-BCS Bowl Game”:

  • 1957 John David Crow, Texas A&M, Gator (14-46/rushing)
  • 1980 George Rogers, South Carolina, Gator (27-113/rushing)
  • 1990 Ty Detmer, BYU, Holiday (11-23, 120/passing)
  • 1995 Eddie George, Ohio State, Citrus (25-101/rushing)
  • 2007 Tim Tebow, Florida, Capital One (17-33, 154/passing)

 

In a couple of these “Non-BCS Bowl Games” that the Heisman winner would play in, their teams displayed offensive fireworks that lit up the scoreboard.

Capping his last year in Stillwater, Barry Sanders found the end zone five times in leading his team to a 62-14 wipe out of Wyoming.

In the most recent such game, Baylor’s Robert Griffin III would only score twice, but would orchestrate many of the Bears many comebacks in its match-up with Washington, winning 67-53. This would be highest scoring game in bowl history for a game played in regulation.

 

Here is a summary of the Heisman Trophy winners in the postseason:

 

Year Winner           Team             Bowl        Opponent        D   Score
1935 Jay Berwanger    Chicago          None
1936 Larry Kelley     Yale             None
1937 Clint Frank      Yale             None
1938 Davey O'Brien    Texas Christian  Sugar       Carnegie Tech   W    15-7
1939 Nile Kinnick     Iowa             None
1940 Tom Harmon       Michigan         None
1941 Bruce Smith      Minnesota        None
1942 Frank Sinkwich   Georgia          Rose        UCLA            W     9-0
1943 Angelo Bertelli  Notre Dame       None
1944 Les Horvath      Ohio State       None
1945 Doc Blanchard    Army             None
1946 Glenn Davis      Army             None
1947 Johnny Lujack    Notre Dame       None
1948 Doak Walker      SMU              Cotton      Oregon          W   21-13
1949 Leon Hart        Notre Dame       None
1950 Vic Janowicz     Ohio State       None
1951 Dick Kazmaier    Princeton        None
1952 Billy Vessels    Oklahoma         None
1953 Johnny Lattner   Notre Dame       None
1954 Alan Ameche      Wisconsin        None
1955 Howard Cassady   Ohio State       None
1956 Paul Hornung     Notre Dame       None
1957 John David Crow  Texas A&M        Gator       Tennessee       L     0-3
1958 Pete Dawkins     Army             None
1959 Billy Cannon     LSU              Sugar       Ole Miss        L    0-21
1960 Joe Bellino      Navy             Orange      Missouri        L   14-21
1961 Ernie Davis      Syracuse         Liberty     Miami           W   15-14
1962 Terry Baker      Oregon State     Liberty     Villanova       W     6-0
1963 Roger Staubach   Navy             Cotton      Texas           L    6-28
1964 John Huarte      Notre Dame       None
1965 Mike Garrett     USC              None
1966 Steve Spurrier   Florida          Orange      Georgia Tech    W   27-12
1967 Gary Beban       UCLA             None
1968 O.J. Simpson     USC              Rose        Ohio State      L   16-27
1969 Steve Owens      Oklahoma         None
1970 Jim Plunkett     Stanford         Rose        Ohio State      W   27-17
1971 Pat Sullivan     Auburn           Sugar       Oklahoma        L   22-40
1972 Johnny Rodgers   Nebraska         Orange      Notre Dame      W    40-6
1973 John Cappelletti Penn State       Orange      LSU             W    16-9
1974 Archie Griffin   Ohio State       Rose        USC             L   17-18
1975 Archie Griffin   Ohio State       Rose        UCLA            L   10-23
1976 Tony Dorsett     Pittsburgh       Sugar       Georgia         W    27-3
1977 Earl Campbell    Texas            Cotton      Notre Dame      L   38-10
1978 Billy Sims       Oklahoma         Orange      Nebraska        W   31-24
1979 Charles White    USC              Rose        Ohio State      W   17-16
1980 George Rogers    South Carolina   Gator       Pittsburgh      L    9-37
1981 Marcus Allen     USC              Fiesta      Penn State      L   10-26
1982 Herschel Walker  Georgia          Sugar       Penn State      L   23-27
1983 Mike Rozier      Nebraska         Orange      Miami           L   30-31
1984 Doug Flutie      Boston College   Cotton      Houston         W   45-28
1985 Bo Jackson       Auburn           Cotton      Texas A&M       L   16-36
1986 Vinny Testaverde Miami            Fiesta      Penn State      L   10-14
1987 Tim Brown        Notre Dame       Cotton      Texas A&M       L   10-35
1988 Barry Sanders    Oklahoma State   Holiday     Wyoming         W   62-14
1989 Andre Ware       Houston          None
1990 Ty Detmer        Brigham Young    Holiday     Texas A&M       L   14-65
1991 Desmond Howard   Michigan         Rose        Washington      L   14-34
1992 Gino Torretta    Miami            Sugar       Alabama         L   13-34
1993 Charlie Ward     Florida State    Orange      Nebraska        W   18-16
1994 Rashaan Salaam   Colorado         Fiesta      Notre Dame      W   41-24
1995 Eddie George     Ohio State       Citrus      Tennessee       L   14-20
1996 Danny Wuerffel   Florida          Sugar       Florida State   W   52-20
1997 Charles Woodson  Michigan         Rose        Washington St.  W   21-16
1998 Ricky Williams   Texas            Cotton      Mississippi St. W   38-11
1999 Ron Dayne        Wisconsin        Rose        Stanford        W    17-9
2000 Chris Weinke     Florida State    Orange      Oklahoma        L    2-13
2001 Eric Crouch      Nebraska         Rose        Miami           L   14-37
2002 Carson Palmer    USC              Orange      Iowa            W   38-17
2003 Jason White      Oklahoma         Sugar       LSU             L   14-21
2004 Matt Leinart     USC              Orange      Oklahoma        W   55-19
2005 Reggie Bush      USC              Rose        Texas           L   38-41
2006 Troy Smith       Ohio State       BCS Title   Florida         L   14-41
2007 Tim Tebow        Florida          Capital One Michigan        L   35-41
2008 Sam Bradford     Oklahoma         BCS Title   Florida         L   14-24
2009 Mark Ingram      Alabama          BCS Title   Texas           W   37-21
2010 Cam Newton       Auburn           BCS Title   Oregon          W   22-19
2011 Robert Griffin   Baylor           Alamo       Washington      W   67-53

 

All-Time Great Receiver Pete Pihos Passes

Pete Pihos, a College and Pro Football Hall of Famer, died early today in a nursing home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina at the age of 87. It has been a tough year for Pro Football Hall of Famers with the deaths of many all-time greats, including John Henry Johnson, John Mackey, Ollie Matson, Joe Perry and Andy Robustelli. 

Pihos was an All-American at Indiana and a veteran of World War II. He was a 6-time Pro Bowler and 5-time First Team All-Pro in nine professional seasons, all with the Philadelphia Eagles. He led the NFL in receptions for three consecutive seasons (1953-55), receiving yardage twice and once in receiving touchdowns.

Pihos was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1966 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1970.

When his career ended after the 1955 season, “The Golden Greek” ranked third all-time in receptions, fourth in receiving yardage, and tied for second in receiving TDs.

Here is a listing of the top ten receivers in history after the 1955 season:

PLAYER           GAMES   REC   YARDS   AVG  TDS  YEARS
DON HUTSON        116    488   7,991  16.4   99  1935-45
TOM FEARS          85    395   5,348  13.5   38  1948-55
PETE PIHOS        107    373   5,619  15.1   61  1947-55
DANTE LAVELLI     112    366   6,144  16.8   61  1946-55
Mac Speedie        86    349   5,602  16.1   33  1946-52
ELROY HIRSCH      103    320   5,949  18.6   48  1946-55
Elbie Nickel      107    292   4,640  15.9   31  1947-55
Jim Benton         91    288   4,801  16.7   45  1938-40,42-47
Hugh Taylor        94    272   5,233  19.2   58  1947-54
Dan Edwards        70    234   2,898  12.4   16  1948-54

 

NOTE: ALL CAPS = Pro Football Hall of Famer
Source: Pro-Football-Reference.com

 

Hang Time Outside The Hash Marks

Peyton Manning is trying to come back from neck surgery. When a football player starts having issues with their neck, you have to start wondering how much longer their career will last. I always thought Manning would just keep on playing until he decides it is time to go. He may not have that choice. His body may make that decision for him.

If he does line up behind the center in week one of the regular season, he will continue his consecutive starts streak. Brett Favre holds the record with 297 consecutive regular season starts at quarterback. Manning is second at 208. So Manning needs to start 90 more consecutive games over the next six seasons to break the record.  That would be the tenth game of the 2016 season.

Besides the streak, Manning has the potential to break most of Favre’s other records. Here is what he would have to do in the next 90 games to break Favre’s passing marks for attempts, completions, yards, touchdowns and interceptions:

  ATT   COMP    YARDS   TDS   INT
2,960  1,619   17,011   110   139

 

In terms of breaking all these records within these 90 games, Manning’s season averages would look like this:

  ATT   COMP    YARDS   TDS   INT
  527    288    3,025    20    25

 

These would be subpar seasons for Manning. However, with injuries and Father Time creeping up on him, these averages would be acceptable, providing his next few seasons are better than his last few. So to break the completion mark, he would just have to complete 54.7 percent of his passes; a percentage not good in today’s game but not too shabby in the 1970s. His current career mark is 64.9%. He has never had a percentage as low as 54.7 so it would be un-Manning like, or should I say, un-Peyton like if that was his percentage over the next 90 games. He has had only one season under sixty percent and that was his rookie campaign in 1998 when he completed 56.7% of his passes. Archie, his dad, completed 55.2% for his career, and his brother Eli has completed 58% thus far in his career.

To be fair to Eli, his completion percentage has improved. He has gone over 60 percent the last three seasons, with a career-best 62.9 mark in 2010. BTW, Eli has a chance to move to the third spot in the all-time consecutive regular season QB starts list. He is currently in the sixth spot with 103 starts. With sixteen more starts in 2011, he would be at 119, three better than the current number three guy, Ron Jaworski. As a Giants fan, Eli can drive me nuts. However, the guy comes and plays week in and week out, giving it his all. If you look at his career numbers, they are pretty good and getting better each year. No matter what Eli does the rest of his career, he has already brought a championship to New York. I remember saying out loud during Super Bowl XLII, “If Eli brings us a championship, he gets a free pass the rest of his career.” I remind myself of that statement every time he throws an interception or fails to get the job done in the red zone.

It is interesting to note that if Peyton goes 45-45 in his next 90 games, he would have the same win-loss record as Favre. Favre has the most career wins at QB with an 186-112 regular season record. Peyton is currently at 141-67. Besides Favre, only John Elway (148-82-1) and Dan Marino (147-93) have more wins than Peyton. There is no guarantee he will pass both of them this season.

 

Don Chandler passed away on Thursday at the age of 76. He was among the best special teams players of his generation. After leading all major college punters with a 44.3 average for the University of Florida in his senior season, Chandler became a New York Giant in 1956.  He was the Giants’ punter for the next nine seasons. He also became their placekicker in 1962. His last three seasons (1965-1967) were with the dynasty Green Bay Packers. He played on four championship teams; his rookie season and his seasons with the Packers. He also played on teams that went to the NFL Championship Game in 1958, 1959, and 1961 through 1963, which included two loses to the Packers.

Chandler was the NFL All-Decade punter of the 1960s. He punted for 28,678 yards with a 43.5 average. His yardage total was number one all-time when he retired. As a placekicker, he connected for 94 field goals with 530 points scored. The Pro Football Hall of Fame has not been too generous to special teams players. If they were, Chandler would be a good candidate to be enshrined.

 

Here is a list of the only players to kick 50 or more field goals and punt for 20,000 yards:

PLAYER            GAMES   FG   FGA    PCT  PUNTS   YARDS   AVG   YEARS
Don Cockroft       188   216   328   65.9    651  26,262  40.3   1968-80
Sam Baker          195   179   316   56.6    703  29,938  42.6   1953,56-69
Tommy Davis        138   130   276   47.1    511  22,833  44.7   1959-69
Don Chandler       154    94   161   58.4    660  28,678  43.5   1956-67
Danny Villanueva   110    85   160   53.1    488  20,862  42.8   1960-67
Dennis Partee      111    71   121   58.7    519  21,417  41.3   1968-75

 

Special teams players have had a difficult time getting into the Hall. To me it seems unfair. I know they play less demanding positions, but special teams is a huge part of the game. If you are the best at your position in your era, you should be honored for it.

Here is an honor roll of some of my favorite special teams players that have been overlooked by the Hall of Fame to this point (retired before the 2006 season):

Gary Anderson, Kicker (1982-2004)
Sam Baker, Kicker/Punter (1953,56-69)
Jim Bakken, Kicker (1962-78)
Timmy Brown, Running Back/Kick Returner (1959-68)
Gino Cappelletti, Flanker/Kicker (1960-70)
Don Chandler, Punter/Kicker (1956-67)
Don Cockroft, Kicker/Punter (1968-80)
Fred Cox, Kicker (1963-77)
Ward Cuff, Back/Kicker (1937-47)
Tommy Davis, Kicker/Punter (1959-69)
Ted Fritsch, Fullback/Linebacker/Kicker/Kick Returner (1942-50)
Horace Gillom, Punter/End (1947-56)
Bruce Gossett, Kicker (1964-74)
Mel Gray, Kick Returner (1986-97)
Bobby Joe Green, Punter (1960-73)
Ray Guy, Punter (1973-86)
Abner Haynes, Halfback/Kick Returner (1960-67)
John James, Punter (1972-84)
Dave Jennings, Punter (1974-87)
Norm Johnson, Kicker (1982-99)
Billy “White Shoes” Johnson, Kick Returner/Wide Receiver (1974-80,82-88)
Sean Landeta, Punter (1985-2005)
Pat Leahy, Kicker (1974-91)
Nick Lowery, Kicker (1978,80-96)
Jack Manders, Back/Kicker (1933-40)
Eric Metcalf, Kick Returner/Running Back/Wide Receiver (1989-99,2001-02)
Lou Michaels, Kicker/Linebacker (1958-69,71)
Brian Mitchell, Kick Returner/Running Back (1990-2003)
Mark Moseley, Kicker (1970-72,74-86)
Eddie Murray, Kicker (1980-95,97,99-2000)
Greg Pruitt, Running Back/Kick Returner (1973-84)
Reggie Roby, Punter (1983-98)
Rohn Stark, Punter (1982-97)
Steve Tasker, Special Teams Player (1984-97)
Jim Turner, Kicker (1964-79)
Rick Upchurch, Kick Returner/Wide Receiver (1975-83)
Bobby Walston, End/Kicker (1951-62)
Jerrel Wilson, Punter (1963-78)
Buddy Young, Halfback/Kick Returner (1947-55)
Note: Years only include AAFC, AFL and NFL seasons.

 

It will be interesting to see how Morten Andersen is voted on in 2013. Andersen may have been the game’s greatest kicker and is the all-time points leader in the NFL. With that said, football fans in Canada may argue Lui Passaglia is the greatest kicker in history. In a 25-year Canadian Football League career (1976-2000), Passaglia made 875 field goals and scored 3,991 points. He also punted 3,142 times for 133,832 yards. Bob Cameron (1980-2002) broke his punting yardage mark in 2002, ending his career with 134,301 yards on 3,129 punts.

Speaking of the CFL, are you watching Montreal’s Anthony Calvillo this season? On Thursday, he threw his 400th career touchdown and went over the 70,000 yard mark. Calvillo broke Damon Allen’s CFL touchdown passing record earlier in the year when he tossed his 395th TD. Allen, the brother of Pro Football Hall of Famer Marcus Allen, was snubbed this year by the Canadian Football Hall of Fame. Kind of shocking the CFL’s all-time leading passer (72,831 yards) and third all-time leading rusher (11,920 yards) didn’t make it. I would think the Hall will correct itself next year.

Calvillo’s 400th TD pass makes him just the fourth professional QB to accomplish this feat; joining Brett Favre (508), Warren Moon (435) and Dan Marino (420). Moon played in both the CFL (1978-83) and NFL (1984-2000) to accomplish the milestone (144 in CFL and 291 in NFL). Peyton Manning is next up with 399 TDs entering the 2011 NFL season. Calvillo was also the fourth QB to go over the 70,000 yard mark in pro football history, joining Allen, Favre and Moon.

If you’re a fan of the CFL and love history and statistics, I highly recommend picking up a copy of The Canadian Pro Football Encyclopedia. I used to be a member of the Canadian Football Historical Association. When the CFHA was formed in 2003, one of their goals was to create a Canadian football encyclopedia since no definite source existed. Unfortunately, the CHFA folded in 2006 without creating this encyclopedia. To my delight, two of football’s best researchers, Tod Maher and Bob Gill, published The Canadian Pro Football Encyclopedia after the 2010 CFL season. The book covers “Every Player, Coach and Game, 1946-2010” as the front cover states. The book is available from Amazon.com.

 

A final list…Here are the runners with 9,000 career rushing yards in pro football history through 1967, including statistics from the AAFC, AFL, CFL and NFL:

PLAYER           GAMES    ATT      YARDS    AVG   TDS    YEARS
Jim Brown         118    2,359    12,312    5.2   106    1957-65
Johnny Bright     175    1,969    10,909    5.5    70    1952-64
Joe Perry         181    1,929     9,723    5.0    71    1948-63
Cookie Gilchrist  149    1,771     9,204    5.2    65    1956-67
Normie Kwong      184    1,745     9,022    5.2    76    1948-60*

 

Notes: *Totals do not include attempts and yards for the 1948 and 1949 seasons.
Brown played in the NFL. Bright and Kwong played in the CFL. Perry played in the AAFC and NFL.
Gilchrist played in the CFL and AFL.

 

Most Career Wins and No Consensus National Championship

In a few short weeks, the 2011 college football season will kickoff. As with the start of every season, the same question on minds of fans, alumni and the media is “Who will be the season’s national champions?”

Many of the game’s winningest coaches have won titles; while a number of successful leaders have done well during the seasons, they just can’t seem to as the old cliché’ states: ‘Win the Big One!’

Four of college football’s winningest retired coaches—ones with at least 200 victories—never won an Associated Press (AP) title—as they have combined for 468 all-time wins; but none as a national championship coach.

Bo Schembechler won 234 games in a career that began in 1963 at Miami of Ohio; as it would end in 1988 as coach of the Michigan Wolverines; but no title.

Amazingly, of the 10 coaches that won at least 180 on this list, three have ties to the Big 10 Conference.

Two wins back of Schembechler is former Iowa Head Coach Hayden Fry; while John Cooper, who retired in 2000 after leading Ohio State to 111 of his 192 career victories, is 42 wins behind.

Don Neehlan, a former assistant under Schembechler, and Jim Sweeney are the other members with 200 career wins and no title; winning 202 and 200, respectively.

Joe Glenn, who last coached at Wyoming in 2008, is on this list as well. He did win titles at Northern Colorado in 1996-97 (NCAA II) and a 2001 NCAA 1-AA crown at Montana; two years before accepting the Wyoming job.

                Retired Coaches
Coach              Seasons            Wins
Bo Schembechler    1963-88            234
Hayden Fry         1962-98            232
Don Nehlen         1968-2000          202
Jim Sweeney        1963-77,80-96      200
John Cooper        1962-2000          192
George Welsh       1973-2000          188
Joe Glenn          1976-79,89-2008    188
Dennis Franchione  1981-82,85-2007    187
Dick Tomey         1977-2009          183
Jackie Sherrill    1976-89,91-2003    180

 

Among active coaches, Virginia Tech’s Frank Beamer leads the way. He has been a successful coach during his career; recording 240 triumphs—the most of any coach without a title, both active and retired.

Chris Ault, who began his career in 1976 and has retired twice only to comeback, has won 219 career victories; which is second on the active list and fourth all-time.

Notre Dame’s Brian Kelly and Georgia Tech’s Paul Johnson are on the active Bowl Sub Division list of coaches without a crown, but both have won titles in divisions below BSD.

Johnson won back-to-back crowns with NCAA 1AA power Georgia Southern, in 1999 and 2000; while Kelly led one of the best NCAA II schools, Grand Valley State, to the 2002 and 2003 championships.

                 Active Coaches
Coach             Current Team    1st Year    Wins
Frank Beamer      Virginia Tech     1981      240
Chris Ault        Nevada            1976      219
Brian Kelly       Notre Dame        1981      178
Mike Price        UTEP              1981      169
Larry Blakeney    Troy              1991      160
Bill Snyder       Kansas State      1989      149
Gary Pinkel       Missouri          1991      150
Houston Nutt      Ole Miss          1993      132
Paul Johnson      Georgia Tech      1997      133
Tommy Tuberville  Texas Tech        1995      110

 

Tex Noel is the Executive Director of the Intercollegiate Football Researchers Association.

John Mackey RIP!

Baltimore Colts legend John Mackey passed away yesterday at the age of 69. A powerful and speedy tight end, Mackey helped revolutionize the position from mostly a blocking position to another passing option downfield with the possibility of breaking it for the end zone. His 15.8 yards per catch average ranks high among all tight ends in history. In 1992, Mackey was the second tight end, after Mike Ditka, to be elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

In tribute to the pioneering tight end, below is a listing of all players who primarily played tight end during their career and had at least 200 career receptions:

            CAREER RECEIVING LEADERS – TIGHT ENDS
PLAYER           GAMES    REC   YARDS    AVG  TDS  YEARS
Tony Gonzalez     222   1,069  12,463   11.7   88  1997-2010
SHANNON SHARPE    204     815  10,060   12.3   62  1990-2003
OZZIE NEWSOME     198     662   7,980   12.1   47  1978-90
Jason Witten      127     617   6,967   11.3   36  2003-10
KELLEN WINSLOW    109     541   6,741   12.5   45  1979-87
Antonio Gates     119     529   7,005   13.2   69  2003-10
Jeremy Shockey    121     510   5,688   11.2   33  2002-10
Frank Wycheck     155     505   5,126   10.2   28  1993-2003
Ben Coates        158     499   5,555   11.1   50  1991-2000
Steve Jordan      176     498   6,307   12.7   28  1982-94
JACKIE SMITH      210     480   7,918   16.5   40  1963-78
Todd Heap         133     467   5,492   11.8   41  2001-10
Mickey Shuler     180     462   5,100   11.0   37  1978-91
Todd Christensen  137     461   5,872   12.7   41  1979-88
Pete Retzlaff     132     452   7,412   16.4   47  1956-66*
Wesley Walls      196     450   5,291   11.8   54  1989-91,93-2003
Keith Jackson     129     441   5,283   12.0   49  1988-96
MIKE DITKA        158     427   5,812   13.6   43  1961-72
Bob Tucker        156     422   5,421   12.8   27  1970-80
Jay Novacek       158     422   4,630   11.0   30  1985-95
Jerry Smith       168     421   5,496   13.1   60  1965-77
Chris Cooley      103     420   4,638   11.0   33  2004-10
Charle Young      187     418   5,106   12.2   27  1973-85
Brent Jones       143     417   5,195   12.5   33  1987-97
Freddie Jones     123     404   4,232   10.5   22  1997-2004
Riley Odoms       153     396   5,755   14.5   41  1972-83
Russ Francis      167     393   5,262   13.4   40  1975-80,82-88
Dallas Clark      104     393   4,535   11.5   44  2003-10
Jackie Harris     167     393   4,410   11.2   25  1990-2001
Randy McMichael   132     387   4,217   10.9   24  2002-10
Pete Metzelaars   235     383   3,686    9.6   29  1982-97
DAVE CASPER       147     378   5,216   13.8   52  1974-84
Alge Crumpler     155     373   4,743   12.7   39  2001-10
Rodney Holman     212     365   4,771   13.1   36  1982-95
Raymond Chester   172     364   5,013   13.8   48  1970-81
Pete Holohan      163     363   3,981   11.0   16  1981-92
Eric Green        120     362   4,390   12.1   36  1990-99
Kellen Winslow     76     362   4,073   11.3   21  2004,06-10
Dave Parks        118     360   5,619   15.6   44  1964-73*
David Hill        176     358   4,212   11.8   28  1976-87
Ken Dilger        156     356   4,099   11.5   24  1995-2004
Mark Bavaro       126     351   4,733   13.5   39  1985-90,92-94
Jimmie Giles      188     350   5,084   14.5   41  1977-89
Marcus Pollard    192     349   4,280   12.3   40  1995-2008
Kyle Brady        197     343   3,519   10.3   25  1995-2007
Paul Coffman      154     339   4,340   12.8   42  1978-88
CHARLIE SANDERS   128     336   4,817   14.3   31  1968-77
JOHN MACKEY       139     331   5,236   15.8   38  1963-72
Jerome Barkum     158     326   4,789   14.7   40  1972-83*
Desmond Clark     162     323   3,591   11.1   27  1999-2010
Rich Caster       161     322   5,515   17.1   45  1970-82*
Tony McGee        156     322   4,089   12.7   21  1993-2003
Preston Carpenter 149     305   4,457   14.6   23  1956-67*
Jim Mitchell      155     305   4,358   14.3   28  1969-79
Doug Cosbie       144     300   3,728   12.4   30  1979-88
Bob Trumpy        128     298   4,600   15.4   35  1968-77
Dan Ross          104     290   3,419   11.8   19  1979-83,85-86
Jim Gibbons       140     287   3,561   12.4   20  1958-68
Heath Miller       92     286   3,233   11.3   29  2005-10
Pete Mitchell     114     279   2,885   10.3   15  1995-2002
Milt Morin        129     271   4,208   15.5   16  1966-75
Hoby Brenner      175     267   3,849   14.4   21  1981-93
Billy Joe DuPree  159     267   3,565   13.4   41  1973-83
John Spagnola     133     263   2,886   11.0   15  1979-82,84-89
Aaron Thomas      133     262   4,554   17.4   37  1961-70*
Bubba Franks      122     262   2,347    9.0   32  2000-08
Marv Cook         112     257   2,190    8.5   13  1989-95
Bruce Hardy       151     256   2,455    9.6   25  1978-89
Christian Fauria  191     252   2,529   10.0   22  1995-2007
Bo Scaife          90     251   2,383    9.5   12  2005-10
Dave Kocourek     115     249   4,090   16.4   24  1960-68
Stephen Alexander 118     247   2,519   10.2   14  1998-2006
Owen Daniels       65     245   2,972   12.1   17  2006-10
Don Warren        193     244   2,536   10.4    7  1979-92
Troy Drayton      122     243   2,645   10.9   24  1993-2000
Eric Johnson       71     240   2,178    9.1    9  2001-02,04,06-07
Tom Mitchell      145     239   3,181   13.3   24  1966,68-77
Vernon Davis       72     237   3,011   12.7   29  2006-10
Ed West           211     237   2,665   11.2   27  1984-97
Jermaine Wiggins  107     236   2,141    9.1   14  2000-06
Benjamin Watson    87     235   2,865   12.2   23  2004-10
L.J. Smith         98     233   2,556   11.0   18  2003-09
Ron Hall          119     230   2,609   11.3   10  1987-95
Ron Kramer        128     229   3,272   14.3   16  1957,59-67
Chad Lewis        116     229   2,361   10.3   23  1997-2005
Zach Miller        62     226   2,712   12.0   12  2007-10
Emery Moorehead   158     224   2,980   13.3   15  1977-88
Henry Childs      103     223   3,401   15.3   28  1974-81,84
Monty Stickles    115     222   3,199   14.4   16  1960-68
Mike Barber       129     222   2,788   12.6   17  1976-85
Daniel Graham     126     222   2,465   11.1   24  2002-10
Rickey Dudley     108     221   3,024   13.7   33  1996-2004
Jay Riemersma     112     221   2,524   11.4   23  1997-2004
Bob Klein         145     219   2,687   12.3   23  1969-79
Alvin Reed        116     214   2,983   13.9   14  1967-75
Eric Sievers      122     214   2,485   11.6   16  1981-90
Ethan Horton      116     212   2,360   11.1   17  1985,87,89-94
Willie Frazier    121     211   3,111   14.7   36  1964-72,75
Andrew Glover     153     208   2,478   11.9   24  1991-2000
Visanthe Shiancoe 128     207   2,268   11.0   24  2003-10
Dave Moore        220     207   2,028    9.8   28  1992-2006
Willard Dewveall   72     204   3,304   16.2   27  1959-64
Ernie Conwell     125     203   2,188   10.8   15  1996-2006
Bennie Cunningham 118     202   2,879   14.3   20  1976-85
Jerramy Stevens   121     202   2,217   11.0   22  2002-10
Howard Cross      207     201   2,194   10.9   17  1989-2001
Steve Heiden      148     201   1,689    8.4   14  1999-2009
Billy Miller      114     200   2,248   11.2   10  1999-2000,02-08
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Fred Arbanas      118     198   3,101   15.7   34  1962-70
Jim Whalen         89     197   3,155   16.0   20  1965-71
Joe Senser         49     165   1,822   11.0   16  1980-82,84


Notes: Arbanas and Whalen are the only tight ends to have 3,000 yards receiving and not catch 200 balls.
Senser is the only tight end to have 1,000 yards receiving in a season and not catch 200 balls.
Players in ALL CAPS are members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
*Played significant time at Offensive End or Wide Receiver.