December 13, 2017

Only NFL Team to Achieve What?

The National Football League’s 2014 regular season is over. Just for fun, let’s look at some oddities in NFL history for each current franchise.

 

Arizona Cardinals

Win a football game 40-11 (11/24/13 vs. Indianapolis Colts)

 

Atlanta Falcons

QB/RB duo each rush for over 1,000 yards in a season (2006)

 

Baltimore Ravens

Win a football game 39-27 (12/2/2001 vs. Indianapolis Colts)

 

Buffalo Bills

Achieved the greatest playoff comeback ever in NFL History (1/3/93 vs. Houston Oilers)

Comeback from 25 or more points during a regular season and playoff game

 

Carolina Panthers

Two players rush for over 1,100 yards in a season (2009)

 

Chicago Bears

Win 16 Consecutive Games by 7+ Points (1941-1942)

Win a game trailing by 20+ Points by scoring three touchdowns on Returns (10/16/06 vs. Arizona Cardinals)

 

Cincinnati Bengals

First team to lead by 14+ points, then trail by 16 points, and rally to win (9/22/2013)

 

Cleveland Browns

Comeback from 25 points and win on the road (10/5/2014)

 

Dallas Cowboys

20 consecutive winning seasons (1966-1985)

 

Denver Broncos

18 Consecutive Games scoring 25+ Points (12/2/2012-12/8/2013)

30 Consecutive Games scoring 20+ Points (2012-2014)

Three Teammates with 2+ Touchdown Receptions, Same Game (9/5/2013 vs. Baltimore Ravens)

Score over 600 points during a season (2013)

5 Players with 10+ Touchdowns during a season (2013)

Only team to comeback from 24 points three times

 

Detroit Lions

Win consecutive games while trailing by at least 20+ Points (Sept. 25 & Oct. 2, 2011)

 

Green Bay Packers

Throw 5+ touchdown passes in consecutive games with two different quarterbacks (12/25/11-Aaron Rodgers and 1/1/12-Matt Flynn)

Score 23+ in six consecutive home games during the first half of a game (2014)

 

Houston Texans

Two Overtime Wins in a Five-Day Span (11/18/2012 &11/23/2012)

 

Indianapolis Colts

Win a game after trailing by 21 Points with less than five minutes left (10/6/2003 at Tampa Bay Buccaneers)

 

Jacksonville Jaguars

Win a football game 24-11 (11/8/1998 vs. Cincinnati Bengals)

 

Kansas City Chiefs

Win a football game 28-2 (9/8/2013 vs. Jacksonville Jaguars)

 

Miami Dolphins

Achieve a perfect season (17-0) in 1972

Win Three Consecutive Games while trailing by 14+ Points in the 2nd Half (1980)

 

Minnesota Vikings

Win a game after trailing by 23 Points with less than nine minutes left (12/1/1985 at Philadelphia)

 

New England Patriots

Win By 20+ Points after Trailing 20+ Points (1/1/12 vs. Buffalo Bills)

 

New Orleans Saints

40 first downs in a game (NFL RECORD-11/10/13 vs. Dallas Cowboys)

Four players with at least 70 receptions in a season (2013)

 

New York Giants

3 quarterbacks throw for over 500 yards in a game (Eli Manning, Phil Simms and Y.A. Tittle)

 

New York Jets

Win a football game 56-35 (9/28/08 vs. Arizona Cardinals)

 

Oakland Raiders

Win a football game 40-35 (12/19/2004 vs. Tennessee Titans)

 

Philadelphia Eagles

Most points scored without Field Goal or Extra Point, Game (12/8/13)

Opened the season with consecutive one-point wins (2012)

Win a game by 14+ points after trailing by 14+ points in their season opener (9/7/14)

 

Pittsburgh Steelers

Over 450 yards passing and over 200 yards rushing in a game (12/13/1958 vs. Chicago Cardinals)

Win a football game 11-10 (November 16, 2008 vs. San Diego Chargers)

Have a quarterback throw six touchdowns in consecutive games (2014)

 

St. Louis Rams

Score 30+ Points in 14 Consecutive Games (November 28, 1999-October 29, 2000)

Score 4 points in the 3rd quarter on two safeties (11/6/11 vs. Arizona Cardinals)

 

San Diego Chargers

Only team to start 0-4 and make the playoffs (1992)

 

San Francisco 49ers

300+ Yards Rushing and Passing, Same Game vs. Buffalo Bills (10/7/12)

 

Seattle Seahawks

Return 4 interceptions for touchdowns (11/4/84- vs. Kansas City Chiefs)

Score safety, return interception for touchdown, return kickoff for a touchdown during a Super Bowl game (SB XLVIII)

Running back with over 100 yards rushing with 4 touchdowns and quarterback rushing for over 100 yards (11/9/14)

 

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Returned 3 interceptions for touchdowns in a Super Bowl game (SB XXXVII)

 

Tennessee Titans

5 Touchdowns of 60+ Yards, Game (NFL RECORD-9/23/2012 vs. Detroit Lions)

 

Washington Redskins

Score exactly 10 points in each quarter of a game (9/9/12 vs. New Orleans Saints)

 

Sources:
www.nfl.com

www.espn.com

http://www.pro-football-reference.com

5 Touchdowns 60+ Yards, Game (9/23/2012)
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/elias?date=20120924

15+ Consecutive Wins by 7+ Points
http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap2000000253528/printable/breaking-down-denver-broncos-month-of-dominance
http://espn.go.com/blog/statsinfo/tag/_/name/denver-broncos

400-Yard Passers
http://espn.go.com/blog/dallas/cowboys/post/_/id/4716589/cowboys-pathetic-pass-d-cracks-nfl-record-book

Baltimore Ravens vs. Denver Broncos (9/5/2013)
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/elias?date=20130906

Buffalo Bills vs. New England Patriots (1/1/2012)
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/elias?date=20120102

Chicago Bears vs. Arizona Cardinals (10/16/2006)
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=2628917

Cincinnati Bengals (9/22/2013)
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/football/nfl/gameflash/2013/09/22/5439/

Houston Texas Consecutive Overtime Wins
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/elias?date=20121123

Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Houston Texans (11/18/2012)
http://scores.espn.go.com/nfl/recap?gameId=321118034

Lose Three Consecutive Games while leading by 10+ Points
http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=news/sports&id=8915970

New England Patriots 350 Yards Offensively
http://scores.espn.go.com/nfl/recap?gameId=321028014

Opposing Players with 200+ Yards Rushing and Receiving, Game
http://www.gazettenet.com/home/9610663-95/nfl-week-13-highlights

Pittsburgh Steelers vs. New England Patriots (11/3/13)
http://scores.espn.go.com/nfl/recap?gameId=331103017

Score exactly 10 points in all 4 quarters of a game
http://www.footballgeography.com/the-nfls-first-team-to-ever-score-exactly-10-points-in-each-quarter/

Scoring 40+ Points in 4 Consecutive Games
http://m.spokesman.com/stories/2004/dec/17/manning-protected-by-vandals/
http://espn.go.com/nfl/recap?gameId=241205011

Scoring 50+ Points in Consecutive Games
http://espn.go.com/nfl/recap?gameId=321122020
http://www.pro-football-reference.com/teams/den/2013.htm

Tennessee Titans vs. Jacksonville Jaguars (12/30/12)
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/elias

 

College Football’s Triple Crown Winners

Say the sports phrase, “Triple Crown” and fans automatically think of horse racing or a hitter in baseball leading his respective league in home runs, RBI and batting average.

When a back has an outstanding season, he will lead the country in rushing and scoring. And if his team needs him to catch a pass out of the backfield or return kicks, he adds value to the team by increasing his overall production.  So when a player compiles statistics in rushing, receiving and return yards, they are totaled and listed under “All-Purpose Yards.”

While there is no official Triple Crown in college football, leading the country in rushing, scoring and all-purpose yards in the same season gives the player the unofficial statistics title of being a Triple Crown winner. College football statistics were first compiled—officially—in 1937.  Since that time, only 13 college football players have earned this Triple Crown.  It should be mentioned that just because a player achieves such a rare accomplishment, it does not guarantee a Heisman Trophy or even achieving All-American honors.

It’s only fitting that the first player to accomplish this feat would coincide with the first year of official stats, 1937.  Byron “Whizzer” White, led the 17th ranked—in the AP Poll—Colorado Buffaloes and the nation in rushing yards (1121), scoring (122) and all-purpose yards per game (246.3)—this mark would be the standard for 51 seasons before falling to the 12th player to claim the three-stat titles, Oklahoma State’s Barry Sanders in 1988.

The last player to win the College Football Triple Crown came from White’s alma mater, Colorado, as Rashaan Salaam captured the title in 1994. The two former CU Buffs winners join a pair of New Mexico State backs as the only sets of winners from the same school. Former New Mexico State backs, Pervis Atkins and Jim Pilot, in 1959 and 1961, respectively, would claim this distinction as well.

After White’s Triple Crown, a span of 14 years would go by before the next player would accomplish this impressive milestone, San Francisco’s Ollie Matson in 1951.  In the next 10 years, four more players would claim the honor, including the first back-to-back winners, Dick Bass (1958) and Atkins.  After Pilot accomplished it in 1961, it would be another 10 seasons before college football would have a player as its next three-stat leader.

In 1971, a player out of the Ivy League would join the list as Cornell’s Ed Marinaro would lead all major college players in rushing, scoring and all-purpose yardage.  He was also the first of three backs on the list to average over 200 yards rushing per game.

Then, starting with Tony Dorsett in 1976 and through the 1994 season, six players earned this rare accomplishment.  In 1977, Texas back Earl Campbell would follow Dorsett and make them only the second set of players to attain the milestone in consecutive seasons.

Next up was Marcus Allen, the lone running back from “Tailback U” (USC) to have a Triple Crown season, in 1981 and Ohio State’s Keith Byars in 1984. After Allen’s and Byars’ accomplishments, college football would have to wait four seasons to see another Triple Crown—but it was well worth the wait.

After playing as a backup for his first two seasons at Oklahoma State, Barry Sanders exploded on the college football scene in 1988; his lone season as the featured back.  Sanders would set the standard in all three categories that year.  These marks have yet to be eclipsed—and more than likely won’t be for some time.  He ran for 2,628 yards—238.9 per game, scored 234 points—21.3 a game and his all-purpose yardage totaled 3,250 yards—averaging 295.5 per game.  Simply an incredible and historic season!

While each player was heavily depended on by their teams, he wasn’t always as noted nationally.  Only nine of the thirteen players would earn All-American laurels and just eight players finished in the top four in the balloting for the Heisman Trophy—five would win college football’s top individual player of the year award.  Furthermore, just over half, seven, would play for a team that would garner a spot in the final AP poll.  Of the seven, just one, Pittsburgh’s Dorsett, in 1976, played for a National Champion.

Salaam’s Triple Crown season came in 1994—the last heading into the 2011 season—becoming the fifth junior to accomplish this rare feat.  Rounding out by classes, the senior class has had six winners and a pair of sophomores made the list, Art Luppino in 1954 and Pilot in 1961.  A freshman has yet to accomplish a milestone season.

Here is a listing of each player and their statistics from their Triple Crown season.

1937 Byron “Whizzer” White, Colorado
Rushing Yards: 1121
All-Purpose Yards: 246.3
Total Points: 122
AA-HT-AP: Y-2-14
 
1951 Ollie Matson, San Francisco
Rushing Yards: 1556
All-Purpose Yards: 226.3
Total Points: 126
AA-HT-AP: Y-N-17
 
1954 Art Luppino, Arizona
Rushing Yards: 1359
All-Purpose Yards: 219.3
Total Points: 166
AA-HT-AP: N-N-NR
 
1958 Dick Bass, Pacific
Rushing Yards: 1361
All-Purpose Yards: 187.8
Total Points: 116
AA-HT-AP: N-N-NR
 
1959 Pervis Atkins, New Mexico State
Rushing Yards: 1556
All-Purpose Yards: 180.0
Total Points: 107
AA-HT-AP: N-N-NR
 
1961 Jim Pilot, New Mexico State
Rushing Yards: 1278
All-Purpose Yards: 160.6
Total Points: 138
AA-HT-AP: N-N-NR
 
1971 Ed Marinaro, Cornell
Rushing Yards: 209.0
All-Purpose Yards: 214.7
Points per Game: 16.4
AA-HT-AP: Y-2-NR
 
1976 Tony Dorsett, Pittsburgh
Rushing Yards: 177.1
All-Purpose Yards: 183.7
Points per Game: 12.2
AA-HT-AP: Y-1-1
 
1977 Earl Campbell, Texas
Rushing Yards: 158.5
All-Purpose Yards: 168.6
Points per Game: 10.4
AA-HT-AP: Y-1-4
 
1981 Marcus Allen, USC
Rushing Yards: 212.9
All-Purpose Yards: 232.6
Points per Game: 12.5
AA-HT-AP: Y-1-14
 
1984 Keith Byars, Ohio State
Rushing Yards: 150.5
All-Purpose Yards: 207.6
Points per Game: 13.1
AA-HT-AP: Y-2-14
 
1988 Barry Sanders, Oklahoma State
Rushing Yards: 238.9
All-Purpose Yards: 295.5
Points per Game: 21.3
AA-HT-AP: Y-1-11
 
1994 Rashaan Salaam, Colorado
Rushing Yards: 186.8
All-Purpose Yards: 213.6
Points per Game: 13.1
AA-HT-AP: Y-1-3

Notes:
AA-Consensus All-America Selection
HT-Rank in Heisman Trophy Balloting
AP-Team’s Final AP Ranking
Y-Yes; N-No; NR-Not Ranked

From 1937-69, highest totals was declared the winner while All-Purpose Yards has always been based on Per Game Average; since 1970 all NCAA statistical leaders.

Tex Noel is the Executive Director of the Intercollegiate Football Researchers Association.

John Mackey RIP!

Baltimore Colts legend John Mackey passed away yesterday at the age of 69. A powerful and speedy tight end, Mackey helped revolutionize the position from mostly a blocking position to another passing option downfield with the possibility of breaking it for the end zone. His 15.8 yards per catch average ranks high among all tight ends in history. In 1992, Mackey was the second tight end, after Mike Ditka, to be elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

In tribute to the pioneering tight end, below is a listing of all players who primarily played tight end during their career and had at least 200 career receptions:

            CAREER RECEIVING LEADERS – TIGHT ENDS
PLAYER           GAMES    REC   YARDS    AVG  TDS  YEARS
Tony Gonzalez     222   1,069  12,463   11.7   88  1997-2010
SHANNON SHARPE    204     815  10,060   12.3   62  1990-2003
OZZIE NEWSOME     198     662   7,980   12.1   47  1978-90
Jason Witten      127     617   6,967   11.3   36  2003-10
KELLEN WINSLOW    109     541   6,741   12.5   45  1979-87
Antonio Gates     119     529   7,005   13.2   69  2003-10
Jeremy Shockey    121     510   5,688   11.2   33  2002-10
Frank Wycheck     155     505   5,126   10.2   28  1993-2003
Ben Coates        158     499   5,555   11.1   50  1991-2000
Steve Jordan      176     498   6,307   12.7   28  1982-94
JACKIE SMITH      210     480   7,918   16.5   40  1963-78
Todd Heap         133     467   5,492   11.8   41  2001-10
Mickey Shuler     180     462   5,100   11.0   37  1978-91
Todd Christensen  137     461   5,872   12.7   41  1979-88
Pete Retzlaff     132     452   7,412   16.4   47  1956-66*
Wesley Walls      196     450   5,291   11.8   54  1989-91,93-2003
Keith Jackson     129     441   5,283   12.0   49  1988-96
MIKE DITKA        158     427   5,812   13.6   43  1961-72
Bob Tucker        156     422   5,421   12.8   27  1970-80
Jay Novacek       158     422   4,630   11.0   30  1985-95
Jerry Smith       168     421   5,496   13.1   60  1965-77
Chris Cooley      103     420   4,638   11.0   33  2004-10
Charle Young      187     418   5,106   12.2   27  1973-85
Brent Jones       143     417   5,195   12.5   33  1987-97
Freddie Jones     123     404   4,232   10.5   22  1997-2004
Riley Odoms       153     396   5,755   14.5   41  1972-83
Russ Francis      167     393   5,262   13.4   40  1975-80,82-88
Dallas Clark      104     393   4,535   11.5   44  2003-10
Jackie Harris     167     393   4,410   11.2   25  1990-2001
Randy McMichael   132     387   4,217   10.9   24  2002-10
Pete Metzelaars   235     383   3,686    9.6   29  1982-97
DAVE CASPER       147     378   5,216   13.8   52  1974-84
Alge Crumpler     155     373   4,743   12.7   39  2001-10
Rodney Holman     212     365   4,771   13.1   36  1982-95
Raymond Chester   172     364   5,013   13.8   48  1970-81
Pete Holohan      163     363   3,981   11.0   16  1981-92
Eric Green        120     362   4,390   12.1   36  1990-99
Kellen Winslow     76     362   4,073   11.3   21  2004,06-10
Dave Parks        118     360   5,619   15.6   44  1964-73*
David Hill        176     358   4,212   11.8   28  1976-87
Ken Dilger        156     356   4,099   11.5   24  1995-2004
Mark Bavaro       126     351   4,733   13.5   39  1985-90,92-94
Jimmie Giles      188     350   5,084   14.5   41  1977-89
Marcus Pollard    192     349   4,280   12.3   40  1995-2008
Kyle Brady        197     343   3,519   10.3   25  1995-2007
Paul Coffman      154     339   4,340   12.8   42  1978-88
CHARLIE SANDERS   128     336   4,817   14.3   31  1968-77
JOHN MACKEY       139     331   5,236   15.8   38  1963-72
Jerome Barkum     158     326   4,789   14.7   40  1972-83*
Desmond Clark     162     323   3,591   11.1   27  1999-2010
Rich Caster       161     322   5,515   17.1   45  1970-82*
Tony McGee        156     322   4,089   12.7   21  1993-2003
Preston Carpenter 149     305   4,457   14.6   23  1956-67*
Jim Mitchell      155     305   4,358   14.3   28  1969-79
Doug Cosbie       144     300   3,728   12.4   30  1979-88
Bob Trumpy        128     298   4,600   15.4   35  1968-77
Dan Ross          104     290   3,419   11.8   19  1979-83,85-86
Jim Gibbons       140     287   3,561   12.4   20  1958-68
Heath Miller       92     286   3,233   11.3   29  2005-10
Pete Mitchell     114     279   2,885   10.3   15  1995-2002
Milt Morin        129     271   4,208   15.5   16  1966-75
Hoby Brenner      175     267   3,849   14.4   21  1981-93
Billy Joe DuPree  159     267   3,565   13.4   41  1973-83
John Spagnola     133     263   2,886   11.0   15  1979-82,84-89
Aaron Thomas      133     262   4,554   17.4   37  1961-70*
Bubba Franks      122     262   2,347    9.0   32  2000-08
Marv Cook         112     257   2,190    8.5   13  1989-95
Bruce Hardy       151     256   2,455    9.6   25  1978-89
Christian Fauria  191     252   2,529   10.0   22  1995-2007
Bo Scaife          90     251   2,383    9.5   12  2005-10
Dave Kocourek     115     249   4,090   16.4   24  1960-68
Stephen Alexander 118     247   2,519   10.2   14  1998-2006
Owen Daniels       65     245   2,972   12.1   17  2006-10
Don Warren        193     244   2,536   10.4    7  1979-92
Troy Drayton      122     243   2,645   10.9   24  1993-2000
Eric Johnson       71     240   2,178    9.1    9  2001-02,04,06-07
Tom Mitchell      145     239   3,181   13.3   24  1966,68-77
Vernon Davis       72     237   3,011   12.7   29  2006-10
Ed West           211     237   2,665   11.2   27  1984-97
Jermaine Wiggins  107     236   2,141    9.1   14  2000-06
Benjamin Watson    87     235   2,865   12.2   23  2004-10
L.J. Smith         98     233   2,556   11.0   18  2003-09
Ron Hall          119     230   2,609   11.3   10  1987-95
Ron Kramer        128     229   3,272   14.3   16  1957,59-67
Chad Lewis        116     229   2,361   10.3   23  1997-2005
Zach Miller        62     226   2,712   12.0   12  2007-10
Emery Moorehead   158     224   2,980   13.3   15  1977-88
Henry Childs      103     223   3,401   15.3   28  1974-81,84
Monty Stickles    115     222   3,199   14.4   16  1960-68
Mike Barber       129     222   2,788   12.6   17  1976-85
Daniel Graham     126     222   2,465   11.1   24  2002-10
Rickey Dudley     108     221   3,024   13.7   33  1996-2004
Jay Riemersma     112     221   2,524   11.4   23  1997-2004
Bob Klein         145     219   2,687   12.3   23  1969-79
Alvin Reed        116     214   2,983   13.9   14  1967-75
Eric Sievers      122     214   2,485   11.6   16  1981-90
Ethan Horton      116     212   2,360   11.1   17  1985,87,89-94
Willie Frazier    121     211   3,111   14.7   36  1964-72,75
Andrew Glover     153     208   2,478   11.9   24  1991-2000
Visanthe Shiancoe 128     207   2,268   11.0   24  2003-10
Dave Moore        220     207   2,028    9.8   28  1992-2006
Willard Dewveall   72     204   3,304   16.2   27  1959-64
Ernie Conwell     125     203   2,188   10.8   15  1996-2006
Bennie Cunningham 118     202   2,879   14.3   20  1976-85
Jerramy Stevens   121     202   2,217   11.0   22  2002-10
Howard Cross      207     201   2,194   10.9   17  1989-2001
Steve Heiden      148     201   1,689    8.4   14  1999-2009
Billy Miller      114     200   2,248   11.2   10  1999-2000,02-08
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fred Arbanas      118     198   3,101   15.7   34  1962-70
Jim Whalen         89     197   3,155   16.0   20  1965-71
Joe Senser         49     165   1,822   11.0   16  1980-82,84


Notes: Arbanas and Whalen are the only tight ends to have 3,000 yards receiving and not catch 200 balls.
Senser is the only tight end to have 1,000 yards receiving in a season and not catch 200 balls.
Players in ALL CAPS are members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
*Played significant time at Offensive End or Wide Receiver.