March 26, 2017

A Backgrounder on the 49ers and Giants in the Playoffs

During the ‘80s the 49ers and Giants matched up four times in the playoffs, twice in San Francisco and then twice in the Meadowlands. Here, adapted from my e-book covering the 49ers under Bill Walsh, are summaries of these four games, followed by quick notes on the teams’ three following playoff games and a wrapup of the Giants-49ers playoff rivalry. I do not claim that looking back at these games has any predictive value for the NFC title game Sunday, but the renewal of a rivalry that goes more than 30 years back is a welcome occasion to reflect on the clashes between two of the great teams of the past few decades.

1981
In a game deeply overshadowed by the next week’s title game vs. the Cowboys, the 49ers beat the Giants, 38-24, at Candlestick. In the second quarter, a Ricky Patton 25-yard run produces a 24-7 lead for the Niners. But the Giants come back and, in the third quarter, go on a drive that puts them at the SF 11, hoping to tie the game at 24 with a touchdown. A fine defensive play by Eric Wright and following missed 21-yard field goal by the Giants’ Joe Danelo leaves the 49ers still up 24-17. A 49er touchdown on a short drive and then a second touchdown on a 20-yard Ronnie Lott interception return late in the fourth quarter seals the game.

Afterward, Giants coach Ray Perkins predicts: “Next Sunday the Cowboys will win. The Cowboys are a better football team. That’s nothing against the 49ers, but the Cowboys have been in this situation before and they’re a better football team.”

Giants linebacker Harry Carson: “During the week you only have time to work on so many things. But the 49er passing game is so complex, so sophisticated, there just isn’t time to work on everything that they might use against you.”

49ers tight end Charle Young: “Montana is a winner. I can see it in his eyes.”

1984
As in the 1981 playoffs, the 49ers start their trip to the Super Bowl at home, playing the Giants. Excellent defense and competent but not memorable offense gives the 49ers a 21-10 win. There is not a lot of interesting detail to this game, which in retrospect was a sign that the Giants, who intercept Joe Montana twice, including a 14-yard Harry Carson return for the team’s one touchdown, were ready to handle the 49ers’ complicated offense.

Bill Walsh: “The Giants are definitely a team of the future.”

Joe Montana: “I expected more of Lawrence Taylor coming. I got enough of him, but I expected a lot more.”

1985
The Giants, playing at the Meadowlands, swarm the 49ers for a 17-3 win in the wild card round. The 49ers come into the game banged up from accumulated injuries to Montana, Dwight Clark, Wendell Tyler, and others. An interception of Montana by Terry Kinard sets up one Giants touchdown, and a second touchdown drive gives the Giants more than enough points. Although the 49ers get into Giants territory repeatedly, stout defense and drops by San Francisco receivers prevent the drives from coming to much. A crucial second-quarter, 15-play 49er drive ends in a 21-yard field goal instead of a touchdown.

The Giants get a superb 174 rushing yards, 141 of them from Joe Morris, and put a lot of pressure on Montana, while not allowing him any deep completions.

Lawrence Taylor: “One thing that I think intimidated the 49ers was that long (15-play) drive. They scored three points, and we got three penalties. They were aggressive penalties. We’d get one, and we acted like we didn’t care as long as we were hitting somebody. I think it was enough (for the 49ers) to say, ‘Hey, these guys are crazy.’”

1986
Back in the Meadowlands, the Giants annihilate the 49ers in a 49-3 win. Jerry Rice starts the game with probably his most humiliating play: after catching a slant-in throw from Montana, Rice starts running in the clear, but at the Giant 27, he simply loses the ball from his hands, and Giants strong safety Kenny Hill falls on it in the end zone for a touchback. The Giants respond with an 80-yard drive to go up 7-0, and the second quarter features a midfield interception by the Giants’ Herb Welch to set up Joe Morris for a 45-yard touchdown run, a 57-yard touchdown drive late in the quarter, and a 34-yard Lawrence Taylor interception return for another score just before halftime. On that Taylor play, a frightening hit from future 49er Jim Burt takes Montana out of the game with a concussion. It’s 28-3 at the half, and the rout is really on.

The Giants add three more touchdowns in the third quarter, and so the fourth quarter’s just a matter of running out the clock for both teams. It’s the third-biggest blowout in the history of the NFL playoffs, and the Giants are on their way to a Super Bowl victory.

Rice on his fumble: “I wanted to keep on running into the locker room.”
Lawrence Taylor said that if Rice had scored that “would have made it 49-10.”

Walsh: “We were shattered by a great team. The Giants played a great game. Physically, they just shattered us.”

Giants quarterback Phil Simms: “We were fortunate that we caught them in a few things today, caught them in some blitzes and we made the plays. People say we don’t have good wideouts, but put them across the field and you can’t cover them one-on-one.”

1990, 1993, 2002
After the 1990 season, the Giants came into Candlestick for the NFC title game and won, 15-13, in the most memorable game these two teams have had in the playoffs. A late-game Roger Craig fumble set up Jeff Hostetler to lead about a 45-yard drive ending in a 42-yard Matt Bahr field goal for the win. This game signaled the end of the Montana-led 49ers, as the quest for three titles in a row ended with Montana devastated by a fourth-quarter Leonard Marshall hit, and Craig and Ronnie Lott playing their last game in San Francisco. In 1993, the 49ers to some extent paid the Giants back for 1986 by beating them 44-3 in the division round, a game that featured five Ricky Watters touchdowns. But the 49ers promptly lost their second NFC title game in a row to the Cowboys. And then, after the 2002 season, there was the memorable 39-38 49ers victory in the wild card round, with San Francisco overcoming a 38–14 deficit by scoring 25 points in the second half. A last-minute Giants drive ended with a botched field goal snap and desperation heave to the end zone that fell short.

So in sum, the seven playoff matchups have the 49ers winning four games, the Giants winning three. Gauged by points, the 49ers lead, 161 to 156; the Giants have beaten the 49ers twice on the way to Super Bowl victories, and the 49ers have beaten the Giants twice on the way to Super Bowl victories.

Book Review: The Catch

The play shouldn’t have worked. Every time Joe Montana and Dwight Clark ran the Sprint Wide Option  in practice, they could not convert. But it only needed to work one time. That one time became one of the most famous plays in NFL history. In an instant, the 49ers changed their fortunes forever. The Cowboys had to wait a decade to rediscover theirs.

Read “The Catch” by Gary Myers because:

1. Not too long before Montana threw the ball up in the sky, nobody believed he or Clark would make any sort of impact on the football field. Today “The Catch” is one of the first football highlights that comes to mind.

Dallas could have had Joe Montana in 1979. Months before the draft, Montana toppled Houston by leading a 22-point, 4th quarter comeback in the Cotton Bowl. Tom Landry liked him, but he didn’t really like him. “If we take him, I’ll probably cut him in training camp,” the Hall of Fame coach said. Nevermind that Montana was the highest player on the ‘Boys board, and since when did Dallas not take the best available? (10, Catch)

The phone call Dwight Clark got wasn’t even for him. Bill Walsh called to see Clark’s roommate work out. It just so happened that Steve Fuller wasn’t ready, and Walsh did not want to be kept waiting. He watched Clark work out instead. Leading up to the draft, Walsh kept hearing that Clark would go undrafted. Selecting him would be a waste. Walsh listened for a while, but he eventually went against his advisors. Montana and Clark, the two afterthoughts, were destined to be forever remembered together.

2. You might as well be in the backfield during the fateful drive, thanks to Myers’ narration.

Montana’s end zone heave to Clark was exactly what every boy thinks about before he goes to bed. In San Francisco’s version, the Niners found themselves trailing by one point on the six-yard line with 58 seconds on the clock. “[Montana] was the calmest in the huddle when he should have been the most nervous,” Clark said. “The moment was not too big for him.” (216)

The Sprint Wide Option play call from Walsh never worked in practice. Heck, Clark wasn’t even Montana’s first choice. The ball was supposed to go to Freddie Solomon. That’s how it was supposed to go in the 1982 NFC Championship Game too. Instead, as the make-or-break play unfolded, Solomon slipped. Montana was well aware of Ed “Too Tall” Jones, Larry Bethea and D.D. Lewis coming fast and furious toward him. Clark couldn’t see Montana, but the QB kept his eye on the receiver the whole time. All he could do was throw it up, wait for the beating and leave it to the crowd to tell him whether Clark made the grab.

3. Bill Walsh and Tom Landry are two legends in their own right and central to this story.

Bill Walsh was 47 when Eddie DeBartolo Jr. hired him. Walsh looked like he was 57, so he was all-too aware that the pressure was on. He didn’t start well (8-24 first two seasons.) Initially Walsh didn’t know whether to yell, bully or plead. Apparently he learned, as he’s been likened to Vince Lombardi.

Walsh became a players’ favorite. Landry didn’t allow himself to have those sorts of relationships, though the Cowboys head man made sure to let his players know he cared about them. Landry was stoic and didn’t need words to get his point across. He was old-school, Myers wrote. That, and “The Catch” were two significant reasons why Landry was relieved of his duties. Landry went from feared to misunderstood by new-school players.

Sadly, both Landry and Walsh died of leukemia. What a legacy they left, forever linked by “The Catch.”

Sam Miller is the founder of Sam’s Dream Blog.  A graduate of the University of Illinois, he worked with various teams in sports information and received the Freedom Forum – NCAA Sports Journalism Scholarship for his achievements. At the University of Illinois, Miller regularly wrote feature stories about the football team. He has also served as communications intern for the Angels’ Triple-A affiliate. Prior to that, he worked as a communications intern for USA Basketball and as an associate reporter for MLB.com.

Dan, Still the Man

The Miami Dolphins are terrible.  Let’s talk about it.

For the second straight week, south Florida’s flopping fish punted away a fourth quarter lead and lost, dropping their record to 0-7 and causing people to high-five while watching “The Cove.”

For Leatherheads of my generation it’s a bit jarring that Tony Sparano’s team is, at best, the fifth most-skilled football squad in Florida because we 40-somethings grew up watching Dolphins teams that were slick, tanned and very good.  From Don Shula’s first season as head coach in Miami in 1970 through his last season in 1995 Flipper was quite proud as the aquatic mammals reached the playoffs 16 times, played in five Super Bowls, won two Lombardi Trophies, compiled the NFL’s only completely perfect season and provided young men with hundreds of bronzed, comely cheerleaders to dream about during cold Midwestern nights.

Since Shula left, the ocean’s favorite citizens have stunk like tuna left in a dirty toilet and struggled like a bottlenose with a cleat stuck in its blowhole, reaching the postseason just six times (and not since 2008) and never playing in a conference title game.  The departure of Shula, the NFL’s all-time winningest coach, certainly has contributed to Miami’s malaise but the reason the Dolphins are on my mind – besides the fact that the Chicago Bears have been in a bye week – is that Miami’s second most-famous Dolphin continues to arise in gridiron debates.

Dan Marino – the greatest quarterback ever not named Johnny Unitas – retired from the Dolphins after the 1999 season and swam off into the sunset holding nearly every possible, meaningful NFL passing record.  When Dan called it quits it seemed as if his records of 61,361 career yards and 420 touchdowns would never be equaled and possibly not even approached.  Then, along came Brett Favre who, as a Green Bay Packer, New York Jet, Minnesota Viking and cheeky monkey just kept going and going and going and eclipsed both of those marks.

One of Marino’s other seemingly unreachable records, 48 TD passes in a season (1984) also fell, first to Peyton Manning of the Indianapolis Colts who chucked 49 TD’s in 2004 and then to Tom Brady of the New England Patriots who racked up 50 in 2007.

Now, about the only notable record Marino still holds, besides best hair even after wearing a helmet, is most yards in a single season – 5,084 in 1984.  But even that record might not last much longer.  New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees came just 15 yards short of equaling that record three years ago.  This year Brees is once again preparing to knock Dan out of the box as he’s on pace to smash Dan’s mark by throwing for 5,492 yards.  And he’s not alone.  Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers is projected to throw for 5,408 yards and if Brady keeps it up he’ll throw for 5,392 yards while also growing another dimple.

Will they do it?

Rodgers is the best player in the NFL right now but he has several factors working against him.  One is that he plays in Green Bay which is known for two things: good football and ice.  Mr. Rodgers plays three of his final four games at friendly but frigid Lambeau Field a place that isn’t kind to airborne footballs in December in January.  And if it’s possible to break Marino’s mark while playing games in Arctic conditions (the only one of Green Bay’s final four games not in Wisconsin is in weather-relevant Kansas City) don’t you think Mr. Favre would have done it?  It also works against Aaron that the Packers are so good.  The Pack will almost certainly have sewn up a playoff spot, and possibly top seed in the NFC, with one or two games to go.  So as much as a gamer as Rodgers is it’s hard to imagine Mike McCarthy sending him out there to chuck it at his current rate of more than 30 times a game exposing him to injury if the games are essentially meaningless.

Brady has similar obstacles.  Of his final four games, two will be played in Foxboro, Massachusetts which is as meteorologically sinister as Green Bay.  Brady’s other two games during the season’s final quarter will be in Denver and Washington.  It’s just not easy to throw when Jack Frost and Snowzilla are nipping at your fingers.  Plus, like the Packers, the Patriots will also likely have clinched their fate before the final game though that doesn’t mean Bill Belichick will take his foot off the gas because the Patriots don’t do that, God love ‘em.  Maybe what can really do Brady in is if Wes Welker’s hands fall off.

Drew Brees has the best shot.  He’s more than halfway there already and from now through the end of the season the Saints play exactly one game outside.  As Kurt Warner apologists can attest to but won’t, it’s a little easier to rack up pinball-like pass stats when you’re in the cozy confines of a dome which is a big reason Brees – though certainly skilled and rigorous – has put up Arena-like numbers for so long.

Marino, obviously, played a great many games in Miami which isn’t weather-hell either except for the occasional hurricane.  But by my count, Dan played only 25 dome games during his 17-year career.  What would his numbers be if he had played half of his 242 career games under a roof?  What would Favre’s be?

Perhaps Brees’ best game this season came a couple of Sundays ago when he directed a nearly-perfect offensive assault on the Colts, compiling five TD’s, 325 yards and a 144.9 passer rating as the Saints prevailed by an embarrassing score of 62-7.  New Orleans’ 62 points were the most scored by an NFL team since January 15, 2000 when the Jacksonville Jaguars stampeded to a victory by the exact some score, 62-7, over…Dan Marino’s Miami Dolphins.  It would prove to be Dan’s last game as his Dolphins were disemboweled in the divisional playoffs.  The Dolphins trailed 41-7 at halftime and Marino told head coach Jimmy Johnson that he wanted to go out there in the second half to give it one last shot.  He tried, but it would have taken five miracles and a thousand pairs of Isotoner gloves with stickum for Miami to rally.  And so, the greatest quarterback of the cable TV era was finished.

Brees, Brady and Rodgers might all surpass Marino this year and Dan the Man will slide further down in the record books and, one day, might be remembered as merely a gunslinger who put up gaudy numbers but never won a Super Bowl.  That would be a shame.  Football fans should consider what Marino could have done if he’d had Roger Craig, Jerry Rice and Ronnie Lott on his side as Joe Montana did.  Or how about if late in Dan’s career he’d been handed the gift that John Elway received in Terrell Davis?

Marino was better than Montana and Elway and cooler than Kurt Russell.  He threw hard, talked softly and made funny commercials.  Today’s players are great and we certainly don’t begrudge them for putting up pretty numbers in the current pass-happy protect the quarterback at all costs NFL.  But let’s never forget the dynamic Dolphin who could throw TD’s in his sleep and still gives defensive backs nightmares.

Marino was magnificent.  Time can’t diminish that and numbers can never change that.

 

 

Book Review: The ’85 Bears: We Were the Greatest

When word broke last week about a new book that cast Walter Payton unfavorably, Mike Ditka didn’t mince words about the author. “I’d spit on him. I have no respect for him. Pathetic. Despicable. It serves no purpose,” the former Chicago Bears coach said.

No wonder. Ditka called Payton the best ever. “He was a complete football player. He knew everything… You could do things with him that you couldn’t with other backs,” Ditka said in “The ’85 Bears: We Were the Greatest.” Ditka has plenty more to say with Rick Telander, starting with the Bears’ Super Bowl celebration. Then he takes you back to training camp where the journey began. It’s Ditka, so you know it can’t be dull.

Read this book because:

1. Whether the game was a romp or seized from the jaws of defeat, you’ll feel like you are re-living the ’85 season from preseason through the big game.

Two weeks after a close call in the season opener against Tampa Bay, the Bears again were desperate for help against Minnesota. Jim McMahon had just spent two nights in traction and was fighting a leg infection, but he would not let up on the sideline. “He was driving me crazy!” Ditka said. “Get away from me! I’m thinking. But he’s right there like a mosquito, just pestering me to death,” Ditka said. (82, ’85) McMahon got in and threw three touchdowns to rally the Bears and win an important game against a division rival.

Week 6 was what the Bears had been waiting for. San Francisco humiliated Chicago 23-0 in the 1984 NFC Championship Game. We’ll be back, they said. Sure enough, they returned to sack Joe Montana seven times, and the Fridge went on the offensive for the first of several times that season. In fact, it was the Fridge and not Payton who scored in the Super Bowl. Payton’s scoreless game was one of the coach’s few regrets.

2. Players share their memories of the championship campaign.

“It amazes me that we didn’t win four [Super Bowls.] We lost 11 games in four years and only won one Super Bowl,” McMahon said. (24)

Steve McMichael was a Texan with a lot of heart, Ditka said. The future wrestler hunted rattlesnakes and said of the team’s ’85 season, “Listen, baby, we were vicious.” (156)

Kevin Butler’s future wife worried he was vicious in more than one way. Butler recalled, “The first mini-camp, I go up there after I’m drafted. I’m engaged to be married January 25. I walk out of that meeting, I get on the phone to Cathy, and I say, ‘Hey, we’ve got to change our wedding.’ She’s like, ‘My God, you’ve been up there four hours and you’ve already met somebody.’ I’m like, ‘No, I’m going to make the team and we’re going to the Super Bowl.’” (236)

You can’t forget the Fridge: I let them talk about [my weight]. I was happy then. I’m happy now. (100)

3. And then there’s ‘Da Coach to keep you reading from cover to cover.

“I was in a coat and tie and shades, and it was colder than frozen snot,” Ditka recalled about the championship parade. “All those people, and it was really, really cold. It would have been impressive if it was 80 degrees out, but 25 below? It showed what our team meant to the city of Chicago. To all the Grabowskis.

“See, Grabowski is the name I came up with for the players on our team, and it fit Chicago. It just symbolized that we were hard-hat guys. The other guys ride in limos. We ride in trucks.” (18)

By the end of the book, you’ll be doing the “Super Bowl Shuffle!”

Sam Miller is a graduate of the University of Illinois where he worked with various teams in sports information and received the Freedom Forum – NCAA Sports Journalism Scholarship for his achievements. At the University of Illinois, Miller regularly wrote feature stories about the football team. He has also served as communications intern for the Angels’ Triple-A affiliate. Prior to that, he worked as a communications intern for USA Basketball and as an associate reporter for MLB.com.

Trades Involving Big Name QB’s That Never Happened

It’s often mentioned that championship teams are built through the NFL draft.  It’s a fairly cliché statement, but it’s entirely true.  What’s often overlooked is that draft selections are only one aspect of the draft.  The ability of front office staffs to wheel and deal during the draft can also make lasting impacts on NFL teams.  The most impactful trades often involve quarterbacks.

There are a lot of trade rumors involving QB’s flying around draft weekend, and usually none of them end up true.  Imagine though if some of them did in fact become true.  The NFL landscape would certainly be different.  Listed below are some draft time trade rumors from the past 25 years (as reported by the major media) involving star QB’s, that never became true.

 

1983 NFL Draft – Rumored John Elway/#1 Pick Trades

Before the 1983 NFL draft, John Elway told the Baltimore Colts (owners of the NFL’s #1 pick) not to select him.  That’s because Elway wanted to play for a team located on the west coast, and if he was selected by the Colts, he insinuated he might abandon football, and pursue a career in baseball.  In the end, the Colts selected Elway, but soon after traded him to the Denver Broncos.  The rest is history.

With Elway’s strong statements before the draft, it appeared to the major media that the Colts would trade the #1 pick; thus trading the rights to select Elway.  The Los Angeles Raiders and San Diego Chargers were two teams mentioned as likely candidates to win the Elway sweepstakes.

The San Diego Chargers owned three picks in the first round, and were having difficulty signing All-Pro QB Dan Fouts to a new contract.  The Raiders had a solid veteran QB in Jim Plunkett, but Al Davis always liked to make a splash at the draft.

The Baltimore Colts were willing to trade the #1 pick/Elway to the San Diego Chargers for all three of the Chargers first round picks, but the Chargers were unwilling to give up the 5th overall selection.  Perhaps if the Chargers hadn’t signed Dan Fouts to a new contract the night before, the Chargers might have been more willing to give up that 5th overall pick.

There were a number of different rumored trade offers from the Raiders.  One scenario stated the Raiders were offering a number of top picks in the 1983 and 1984 drafts, as well as former first round selection in QB Marc Wilson.  Another rumor mentioned that the Raiders would consider trading future Hall of Fame RB Marcus Allen.  Lastly, it was also rumored that the Raiders were attempting to attain first round selections, in order to trade them for Elway.  Reportedly, the Raiders were offering RB Kenny King, G Mickey Marvin, and future Hall of Fame DE Howie Long to the Chicago Bears (6th pick) or the Philadelphia Eagles (8th pick).

The Dallas Cowboys were also rumored as being interested in Elway.  It was rumored that the Cowboys offered the Colts their top selection in the 1983 draft (23rd overall), and a number of veteran players, possibly QB Danny White and DT Randy White.

Lastly, despite Elway’s request to play for a team on the west coast, the New England Patriots were supposedly highly interested in selecting Elway.  It was rumored that the Patriots would offer the Colts their first round selections in 1983, 1984, and 1985, as well as a veteran player or another top selection.

In the end, the Denver Broncos were truly the dark horse candidate to get John Elway, and made out the best.

In hindsight, the Chargers should have traded all three first round selections for Elway.  The Chargers did pick up three solid players with their picks; LB Billy Ray Smith, RB Gary Anderson, and DB Gill Byrd.  However, none of those players had Hall of Fame careers.

The Cowboys also should have offered a bit more for Elway.  Although, if they did, I’m sure the team wouldn’t have gone through the collapse they did in 1988 and 1989; which ultimately led to the birth of a dynasty.  Who knows if it was even nothing more than a remote possibility, but the Patriots also should have made more of an effort to get Elway.

Meanwhile, it’s debatable whether the Raiders made the right decision by not trading for Elway.  The Raiders would go on to win the Super Bowl in 1983.  Without Marcus Allen and/or Howie Long, that probably doesn’t happen.   However, I’m sure the Raiders would have loved to have had Elway at QB with some of their more talented teams in the early 1990’s.

Lastly, the Colts would have been better off taking trade offers from any of the rumored trades, before actually selecting Elway.  Once they selected Elway, and he refused to play for them, their bargaining power was reduced significantly.  In the end, the Colts picked up an unproductive QB in Mark Herrmann, a talented tackle, albeit not a Hall of Famer in Chris Hinton, and a first round selection in the 1984 draft (used on G Ron Solt).

 

1987 NFL Draft – Rumored Steve Young Trades

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers signed QB Vinny Testaverde to a contract weeks before they would actually be able to select him #1 in the 1987 NFL draft.  This gave the Buccaneers a few weeks to shop around highly talented QB Steve Young.  Eventually, the San Francisco 49ers would pick up Young for second and third round picks.  However, the Green Bay Packers and the St. Louis Cardinals had also been in trade talks with the 49ers for Young.

After the draft, Packers head coach Forrest Gregg stated the 49ers asking price for Steve Young was too steep.  Meanwhile, the Cardinals elected to choose a QB in the draft by selecting Kelly Stouffer.

Looking back, the Packers should have realized the asking price for Steve Young wasn’t too steep.  However, they came out of it rather unscathed, with a smart draft selection of Don Majkowski, and a smart trade for Brett Favre.  The Cardinals however didn’t get so lucky.  Stouffer never played a snap with the Cardinals, refusing to sign with them.

 

1992 NFL Draft – Rumored Steve Young Trade

The San Francisco 49ers reportedly made a trade offer to the Los Angeles Raiders, in which they were going to trade the NFL’s top rated passer, Steve Young, for the Raiders first and second round selections, and WR Tim Brown.  49ers head coach George Seifert admitted the 49ers attempted to trade up in the draft, but didn’t get into the specifics on any trade offers they may have made.

The Raiders ended up picking defensive lineman Chester McGlockton with their first round pick, and the Raiders traded up in the second round to pick offensive lineman Greg Skrepenak.

Clearly, it looks like the 49ers benefited from this trade not occurring.  Steve Young continued to be one of the best QB’s in the NFL, and led the 49ers to a Super Bowl championship in 1994.

If the trade did go through, the 49ers would have had Hall of Famer Jerry Rice and most likely future Hall of Famer Tim Brown at the receiver’s positions.  Coincidentally, the two players would be paired together as Raiders during the 2001-2003 seasons.

 

1992 NFL Draft – Rumored Phil Simms Trades

What turned out to be a rumor with no legs, the New York Giants were reportedly interested in trading veteran QB Phil Simms, so they could move up in the 1992 NFL draft and select QB David Klinger.  The San Diego Chargers and Los Angeles Raiders were supposedly interested in Simms.  The Giants denied the rumor.  Simms remained with the Giants for a few more years and eventually won the starting job back.   Jeff Hostetler, the Giants starting QB at the time, would end up with the Raiders one year later.

 

1993 NFL Draft – Rumored Joe Montana Trades

If you thought the sight of Joe Montana in a Kansas City Chiefs uniform was strange, imagine how he would have looked in an Arizona Cardinals uniform, or a Tampa Bay Buccaneers uniform.

The Buccaneers were the original front running team to get Joe Montana.  They had a surplus of draft picks, some youthful talent, and Montana worked with Buccaneers head coach Sam Wyche when Wyche was an assistant with the San Francisco 49ers.  But Montana had no interest in going to a team that wasn’t a contender, and chose against being traded to the Buccaneers.

Despite Montana’s request to go to Kansas City, it looked as if Montana would end up in a Cardinals uniform because they were offering more compensation for him.  The Cardinals were offering the 49ers their first round selection in the draft (20th pick).  At that point in the trade negations, no other team had even offered the 49ers a draft selection in the second round.

The Detroit Lions and the Los Angeles Raiders also expressed interest in trading for Montana, but their type of offensive styles didn’t appeal to Montana.

Eventually, the 49ers and Chiefs came to an agreement.  The 49ers sent Montana, safety David Whitmore and their third round selection in the 1994 draft.  In return, the 49ers received the Chiefs first round draft pick (18th overall).

You can’t really fault the Buccaneers or Cardinals for not getting Montana.  Montana wanted to go to the Chiefs, and when the Chiefs offered enough compensation, a deal was made.  The Buccaneers and Cardinals were merely curious bystanders.

 

1995 NFL Draft – Rumored Mark Brunell Trades

In 1995, Mark Brunell wasn’t a household name; however some NFL teams recognized his talents, and were willing to take a chance on him.  The team Brunell played for, the Green Bay Packers, already had a talented and young QB on their roster in Brett Favre.

The Philadelphia Eagles actually had a deal in principle made with the Packers for Brunell, under the stipulation that they would be able to sign Brunell to a long term contract.  Brunell and the Eagles never reached a contract agreement, and the Eagles agreement to send their second and fifth round selections to the Packers fell through.

The St. Louis Rams were also reported as a team interested in Brunell.  In the end, the Jacksonville Jaguars sent their third and fifth round picks to the Packers for Brunell.

If the Eagles had been able to sign Brunell, it would have changed the franchise.  Brunell came into his own during the 1996 playoffs; during a time when the Eagles were struggling to find a suitable QB to lead their talented roster.

 

2010 NFL Draft – Rumored Ben Roethlisberger Trades

Coming off another off-season embarrassment relating to their franchise QB Ben Roethlisberger, it was rumored that the Pittsburgh Steelers were interested in trading him.

It was reported that the Steelers offered Roethlisberger to the St. Louis Rams as a way to attain the #1 pick in the draft.  However, the Rams had no interest in the trade, and selected QB Sam Bradford.

The Cleveland Browns and Oakland Raiders were also mentioned as possible trading partners with the Steelers for Roethlisberger.  The Steelers confirmed they had spoken to the Raiders about Roethlisberger, but denied speaking to the Browns.

 

One final note: If there is a big name QB with trade rumors attached to his name, it appears that the Oakland Raiders will always be interested.  Every QB on this list, with the exception of Mark Brunell, was of interest to the Raiders.

 

Andrew McKillop runs the sports research blog SportsDelve.com.